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LSAT Kung Fu Blog

Aug 7 2017
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Best Online LSAT Prep

Omigod omigod omigod omigod. This pig.

Today is the last entry in our look at each piece of the law school application. We’ve worked chronologically—that is, we took each item in the order that you should (in a perfect world, one in which you can maybe go back in time and fix your mistakes) have been working on it. I’ve chosen to use a Q+A format, to make you feel like we’re in this together. It will be fun. I promise absolutely do not promise that.

Last week, we looked at how your résumé figures into your admissions decision. This week, we’re taking a crack at the application and addenda. Again, we’re going with the Q+A structure, because it’s delightful:

What is it? The LSAC application form is a single electronic application that you can use to apply online to most law schools. Addenda are written additions that you’ll send directly to any law school to which you apply.

Wait. Why would I send a school a “written addition” to my application? Because you had bad grades. There are other conceivable reasons, but that’s the big one. 

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Jul 25 2017
0
The Best LSAT Prep Tips

This giraffe has a stellar résumé.

Over the next few weeks, we’re going to continue our look at each piece of the law school application. We’re going to work chronologically—that is, we’ll take each item in the order that you should (in a perfect world, one in which you can maybe go back in time and fix your mistakes) be working on it. I’ve chosen to use a Q+A format, to make you feel like we’re in this together. It will be fun. I promise absolutely do not promise that.

Last week, we looked at how your Diversity Statement figures into your admissions decision. This week, we’re taking a crack at your law school résumé. Again, we’re going with the Q+A structure, because it’s delightful:

So, what is it? It’s an academic résumé!

You say that like it should mean something to me. Well, what I mean is this: Law schools don't care so much about what kind of employee you’d make; they’re sizing you up as a prospective student. So, the fact that you were salesperson of the month three months running while you worked at Plain Jane's Whips and Chains ("Your Pain is Our Gain!”) isn’t terribly meaningful to them, since it doesn't tell them whether you're likely to succeed in an academic setting. 

Jul 17 2017
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Law School Diversity Statement

See? We can come together. As long as the old white men are front and center.

Over the next few weeks, we’re going to continue our look at each piece of the law school application. We’re going to work chronologically—that is, we’ll take each item in the order that you should (in a perfect world, one in which you can maybe go back in time and fix your mistakes) be working on it. I’ve chosen to use a Q+A format, to make you feel like we’re in this together. It will be fun. I promise absolutely do not promise that.

Last week, we looked at how your Personal Statement figures into your admissions decision. This week, we’re taking a crack at your Diversity Statement. Again, we’re going with the Q+A structure, because it’s delightful:

So, what is it? It’s an additional chance for you to parade your writing before admissions committees!

Yeah, but seriously. What is it? I am serious! The most serious utility of the Diversity Statement to you is that it gives you another chance to show admissions officers that you can write like a mofo. And law schools want students who can write.

OK, I mean that makes some sense to me. Well, it’s true—

Jul 10 2017
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Law School Personal Statement

All you'd need is some stirring theme music. Right?

Over the next few weeks, we’re going to continue our look at each piece of the law school application. We’re going to work chronologically—that is, we’ll take each item in the order that you should (in a perfect world, one in which you can maybe go back in time and fix your mistakes) be working on it. I’ve chosen to use a Q+A format, to make you feel like we’re in this together. It will be fun. I promise absolutely do not promise that.

Last week, we looked at how your LSAT score figures into your admissions decision. This week, we’re taking a crack at your Personal Statement. Again, we’re going with the Q+A structure, because it’s delightful:

So, what is it? It is a brief narrative essay that helps the reader understand who you are.

So all I have to do is bare my soul in two pages of text? No pressure, huh? Yeah, it’s not easy. But where did you get the idea that getting into law school would be easy?

Jul 3 2017
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Best Online LSAT Prep

Can you imagine being attacked by this monster?

Over the next few weeks, we’re going to continue our look at each piece of the law school application. We’re going to work chronologically—that is, we’ll take each item in the order that you should (in a perfect world, one in which you can maybe go back in time and fix your mistakes) be working on it. I’ve chosen to use a Q+A format, to make you feel like we’re in this together. It will be fun. I promise absolutely do not promise that.

Last week, we looked at how your letters of recommendation figure into your admissions decision. This week, we’re taking a crack at your LSAT score. Again, we’re going with the Q+A structure, because it’s delightful:

What is it? A standardized test.

Really? That’s what you’ve got for me? Sigh. It’s just that, if I’m being honest, I don’t know how much more I can talk about the LSAT and keep what little sanity and/or dignity I have left.

Cry me an effing river. It’s your job; just tell me more about the LSAT, OK? OK. It’s purported to be a standardized test of your reasoning abilities, but it is highly susceptible to a pattern-intelligent approach. In other words, you can be very successful at this test without necessarily being a very proficient logician.

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Jun 27 2017
0
LOTR, not LOR.

Nope. That's LOTR. Totally different.

Over the next few weeks, we’re going to continue our look at each piece of the law school application. We’re going to work chronologically—that is, we’ll take each item in the order that you should (in a perfect world, one in which you can maybe go back in time and fix your mistakes) be working on it. I’ve chosen to use a Q+A format, to make you feel like we’re in this together. It will be fun. I promise absolutely do not promise that.

Last week, we looked at how your UGPA figured into your admissions decision. This week, we’re taking a crack at your letters of recommendation (or LOR. Moar acronyms yes!). Again, we’re going with the Q+A structure, because it’s delightful:

Wait. I thought you said you were doing these in the order we should be working on them? I did.

So, wtf, man? Surely this is like, the last thing on my list, pretty much? False! Well, OK; asking for your LOR will be one of the last things you do. But the process of procuring for yourself a truly face-melting letter of recommendation starts almost as soon as you start college.

Jun 19 2017
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Greyhound Pets of America

Did you know there's a group called Greyhound Pets of America? There totally is!

Over the next few weeks, we’re going to take a look at each piece of the law school application. We’re going to work chronologically—that is, we’ll take each item in the order that you should (in a perfect world, one in which you can maybe go back in time and fix your mistakes) be working on it. I’ve chosen to use a Q+A format, to make you feel like we’re in this together. It will be fun. I promise absolutely do not promise that.

So, what are looking at today? Your UGPA.

What is it? A single-digit number measured to the 1/100th that purports to distill your academic worth into an highly-digestible, easily-comparable format and is heavily used by The Man to try to keep you down.

How important is it? It’s worth approximately 40% of your admission decision.

Wait. That seems low. Are you sure? Well, we could put it another way—it’s the second-most important piece of the puzzle at most schools, right behind your LSAT score. Does that help?

Yes. Good.

Jun 12 2017
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Calvin is probably wrong.

Calvin is probably wrong.

So, as part of our occasional LSAT prep series on Logical Reasoning question types, today we’re going to take a look at Point-of-Disagreement (+ Point of Agreement) questions.

First, note that these questions can only be associated with multi-party arguments, in which two distinct arguments are juxtaposed by the test writers. The arguers’ names will inevitably demonstrate a richness of ethnic diversity (which, given how opposed they are to each other’s ideas, demands an answer as to how the LSAT’s authors view the possibility for global harmony.). But I digress…

How they’ll ask:

  • Ronaldo and Cho disagree over whether…
  • The passages above indicate that Tony and Clara would agree that…
  • Olivia’s and Geraldina’s statements provide the most support for holding that they disagree about…
  • Which one of the following most accurately expresses the point at issue between Claude and Kenji?

Point-of-Disagreement Questions stake out a small piece of territory in the no-man’s land between Inference and Main Point Questions. On their face, they’d seem to indicate that we’re to seek the main point, right? You know; the point at issue?

And yet…

Jun 5 2017
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Macauley Culkin is afraid of changes to the LSAT.

Macauley Culkin is afraid of changes to the LSAT.

Short answer: Not much.

Longer answer: they’ll be good for you, a little bit! 

There are four bits of recent news regarding upcoming 2017 and 2018 LSAT administrations:

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May 22 2017
0
Water-Lotta Fun

Water-Lotta Fun (I know. Sorry).

No new post this week. Instead, I'm re-posting this one about the LSAT Writing Sample:

So we were at a key party last weekend with the usual crowd of professional wrestlers, dental hygienists who'd been hitting the nitrous pretty hard, Lil Wayne and T-Pain (AND ALSO T-Wayne, in an ironic twist), and the conversation came around, as it so often does at these things, to the subject of LSAT prep, and specifically, the LSAT Writing Sample.

It’s the sixth section of the test, it’s always administered at the end of the day (when your brain is mostly mush and all you really need to do is go to the nearest bar and order an Irish car bomb, stat), and it is not scored by LSAC.