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LSAT Kung Fu Blog

Jun 19 2017
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Greyhound Pets of America

Did you know there's a group called Greyhound Pets of America? There totally is!

Over the next few weeks, we’re going to take a look at each piece of the law school application. We’re going to work chronologically—that is, we’ll take each item in the order that you should (in a perfect world, one in which you can maybe go back in time and fix your mistakes) be working on it. I’ve chosen to use a Q+A format, to make you feel like we’re in this together. It will be fun. I promise absolutely do not promise that.

So, what are looking at today? Your UGPA.

What is it? A single-digit number measured to the 1/100th that purports to distill your academic worth into an highly-digestible, easily-comparable format and is heavily used by The Man to try to keep you down.

How important is it? It’s worth approximately 40% of your admission decision.

Wait. That seems low. Are you sure? Well, we could put it another way—it’s the second-most important piece of the puzzle at most schools, right behind your LSAT score. Does that help?

Yes. Good.

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Jun 12 2017
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Calvin is probably wrong.

Calvin is probably wrong.

So, as part of our occasional LSAT prep series on Logical Reasoning question types, today we’re going to take a look at Point-of-Disagreement (+ Point of Agreement) questions.

First, note that these questions can only be associated with multi-party arguments, in which two distinct arguments are juxtaposed by the test writers. The arguers’ names will inevitably demonstrate a richness of ethnic diversity (which, given how opposed they are to each other’s ideas, demands an answer as to how the LSAT’s authors view the possibility for global harmony.). But I digress…

How they’ll ask:

  • Ronaldo and Cho disagree over whether…
  • The passages above indicate that Tony and Clara would agree that…
  • Olivia’s and Geraldina’s statements provide the most support for holding that they disagree about…
  • Which one of the following most accurately expresses the point at issue between Claude and Kenji?

Point-of-Disagreement Questions stake out a small piece of territory in the no-man’s land between Inference and Main Point Questions. On their face, they’d seem to indicate that we’re to seek the main point, right? You know; the point at issue?

And yet…

Jun 5 2017
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Macauley Culkin is afraid of changes to the LSAT.

Macauley Culkin is afraid of changes to the LSAT.

Short answer: Not much.

Longer answer: they’ll be good for you, a little bit! 

There are four bits of recent news regarding upcoming 2017 and 2018 LSAT administrations:

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May 22 2017
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Water-Lotta Fun

Water-Lotta Fun (I know. Sorry).

No new post this week. Instead, I'm re-posting this one about the LSAT Writing Sample:

So we were at a key party last weekend with the usual crowd of professional wrestlers, dental hygienists who'd been hitting the nitrous pretty hard, Lil Wayne and T-Pain (AND ALSO T-Wayne, in an ironic twist), and the conversation came around, as it so often does at these things, to the subject of LSAT prep, and specifically, the LSAT Writing Sample.

It’s the sixth section of the test, it’s always administered at the end of the day (when your brain is mostly mush and all you really need to do is go to the nearest bar and order an Irish car bomb, stat), and it is not scored by LSAC.

May 8 2017
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Charlie Day is figuring it out.

Charlie Day is figuring it out.

A few weeks ago, we discussed whether you ought to spend a little time assessing Reading Comprehension passage difficulty. That discussion also applies, in pretty much exactly the same way, to LSAT Games. You should assess difficulty! You shouldn’t spend much time doing it, though! And you should definitely not try comparing games in a section to each other.

It’s time-consuming, dumb prep to compare games within a section. Instead, you should use a system that will allow you to tell, in just a few seconds, whether the game in front of you is the kind of thing you should just pull up your britches and do now, or whether it’s best saved for later. This is the system I endorse.

May 1 2017
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Dogs

Dogs

I recently uploaded a new video to the site (it’s also on YouTube; right here), in which I explain the theoretical basis for smart LSAT prep. I thought you might also enjoy reading it, so I’ve written up what is basically a transcript.

What I want to do here is start by getting you ready in a big-picture, First Principle kind of way for the manner in which we’re going to move you from a place of unfamiliarity, discomfort (and perhaps also fear) to a place of confidence, assurance, and readiness.

The way we’re going to do that is just exactly the way that I did it (and if you haven’t already, and you’re interested, you can see Ye Olde Complete Dave Hall LSAT Scoring Record right here). What I want to do for you is show you how I did it—how I got the 180s and the 177s and the 179 (179? Those bastards)—and how I did it is by prepping smart.

So, what’s smart LSAT prep?

Glad I asked. It gives me an excellent opportunity to answer:

Apr 24 2017
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You're right. Beer evaluations would be more fun.

You're right. Beer evaluations would be more fun.

So, you’re getting into your LSAT prep in a serious way. Like, you’re thinking of taking things to the next level; you may be ready to move in with your LSAT prep (and we all know that’s the fast track to either a messy breakup, or you and LSAT prep makin’ babies and gettin’ married). So you’re at the place where you’re ready to talk about Evaluation Questions. 

Now, if you’re not sure you’re that serious yet about LSAT prep? STOP READING. YOU MAY NOT BE READY FOR THIS JELLY.

For everybody remaining, OK, let’s do this.

First: Evaluation Questions are pretty rare. Don’t expect to see more than one of these on the entire test. Still, they are nowadays asked on most tests, so you should be ready for them if you want that awesome high LSAT score. Don’t worry. This won’t hurt a bit.

The Evaluation Question is asked one of two main ways:

Apr 17 2017
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Now, that's an image we can stand behind.

Now, that's an image we can stand behind.

So, last week we decided together that you ought to be paying attention to the relative difficulty of the passages in the Reading Comprehension section of the LSAT.

Today, we’re going to briefly discuss how to do that. To make things simple, I’ve created a 4-star review system for you to use.

First, some notes: a really good, thorough review of difficulty would depend very heavily on the answer choices you’re given. But! Trying to assess difficulty by including a thorough reading of answer choices would take damn near as much time as it takes to actually read and work the passages. So that would be dumb. And even worse, it’s impossible to know whether answer choice sets are difficult until you have read the passage and the question. Only once you know the right answer can you really assess the relative toughness of the choices.

So, that’s just to say that while having the strongest possible assessment of difficulty is time-consuming and ultimately futile, a good, though imperfect, means of assessment can be done very quickly. 

Apr 10 2017
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Manananggal plays himself.

Manananggal plays himself.

When you’re starting to get serious about your LSAT prep, you start to get granular. Like, you find yourself beginning to think about things like the number of Point of Disagreement questions you might expect to see in each Logical Reasoning section (two), whether the Games section is getting easier or more difficult over time (a little of both. More on that some other time), and the  relative difficulty of LSAT Reading Comp passages (more on that in just, like, a sec). I mean, there’s just a whole big world of wonder out there, right? Well, yeah. There is (a whole big world of wonder).

So let’s talk about that Reading Comp. When test day comes, it probably will be useful to you to think about arranging your attack on RC passages based on difficulty, and not just the order in which they’ve been presented to you. This is for a reason! 

Imagine it like this: Say you’ve got two different LSAT test-takers. One is called Manananggal the Destroyer, Death of Worlds, and the other is called Meredith. 

Apr 3 2017
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That's actually literal Kung Fu right there.

That's actually literal Kung Fu right there.

Today, we’re looking at how your full Velocity course membership will help you increase your LSAT score. We’ll talk about what we can do for you, and the things you’ll need to do in order to succeed. You are not going to let those mofos keep you down. We’re here to help with that. Here’s what you should do:

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