LSAT Kung Fu Blog / LSAT Kung Fu Blog

LSAT Kung Fu Blog

Apr 17 2017
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Now, that's an image we can stand behind.

Now, that's an image we can stand behind.

So, last week we decided together that you ought to be paying attention to the relative difficulty of the passages in the Reading Comprehension section of the LSAT.

Today, we’re going to briefly discuss how to do that. To make things simple, I’ve created a 4-star review system for you to use.

First, some notes: a really good, thorough review of difficulty would depend very heavily on the answer choices you’re given. But! Trying to assess difficulty by including a thorough reading of answer choices would take damn near as much time as it takes to actually read and work the passages. So that would be dumb. And even worse, it’s impossible to know whether answer choice sets are difficult until you have read the passage and the question. Only once you know the right answer can you really assess the relative toughness of the choices.

So, that’s just to say that while having the strongest possible assessment of difficulty is time-consuming and ultimately futile, a good, though imperfect, means of assessment can be done very quickly. 

Apr 10 2017
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Manananggal plays himself.

Manananggal plays himself.

When you’re starting to get serious about your LSAT prep, you start to get granular. Like, you find yourself beginning to think about things like the number of Point of Disagreement questions you might expect to see in each Logical Reasoning section (two), whether the Games section is getting easier or more difficult over time (a little of both. More on that some other time), and the  relative difficulty of LSAT Reading Comp passages (more on that in just, like, a sec). I mean, there’s just a whole big world of wonder out there, right? Well, yeah. There is (a whole big world of wonder).

So let’s talk about that Reading Comp. When test day comes, it probably will be useful to you to think about arranging your attack on RC passages based on difficulty, and not just the order in which they’ve been presented to you. This is for a reason! 

Imagine it like this: Say you’ve got two different LSAT test-takers. One is called Manananggal the Destroyer, Death of Worlds, and the other is called Meredith. 

Apr 3 2017
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That's actually literal Kung Fu right there.

That's actually literal Kung Fu right there.

Today, we’re looking at how your full Velocity course membership will help you increase your LSAT score. We’ll talk about what we can do for you, and the things you’ll need to do in order to succeed. You are not going to let those mofos keep you down. We’re here to help with that. Here’s what you should do:

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Mar 27 2017
0
Your LSAT prep, like this toy, is now solved.

Your LSAT prep, like this toy, is now neatly arranged by color solved.

We’ve been adding so many awesome LSAT features that I—no joke—took a look in our Resources section the other day and realized there was stuff in there I’d completely forgotten we made.

You should check it out!

Here’s everything (I think. I may have missed something) that Velocity can do to help you understand and get ready for the LSAT, for FREEEEEE:

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Mar 13 2017
0
This is what I'm talking about!

This is what I'm talking about!

So, you want to do logic games more efficiently? You’ve come to the right place, kid. Let’s kick off that LSAT prep of yours with some sweet, sweet tips on how to be faster at Games:

Mar 10 2017
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kevin Hart is surprised by Harvard's move.

kevin Hart is surprised by Harvard's move.

You may have read that Harvard Law School is going to start accepting the GRE for admission. WHAT. THE. HOLY. EFF?

It’s true! But what does it mean? And more importantly, what does this mean for you?

Well, this isn’t the first time Harvard has done something like this. In 2009, their business school started accepting GRE scores as well as GMAT scores. Now? Just about everybody does!

So I think it’s fairly likely that within 5 years a majority of law schools will begin accepting GRE scores as well as LSAT scores. 

Unless…

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Mar 6 2017
0
Those are the raised hands of LSAT Reading Comp victory.

Those are the raised hands of LSAT Reading Comp victory.

As you get started with your LSAT prep (or somewhere in the middle of LSAT prep, or even if you’re already well into your LSAT prep. OK, let’s just say that at any point in your LSAT prep), one of the key things you’ll need to figure out is how to find the Main Point of a Reading Comp passage.

Well, that’s where this post comes in! I’ve been thinking about it, and I’ve decided to write a few words on identifying the main point of passages, and you are now reading those words. IT’S AN EXCITING TIME TO BE ALIVE.

Here’s one thing for you to do; every single time you read a passage, pretend that you have a friend sitting next to you. We’ll call that friend Francisco. 

When you finish reading, turn to Francisco and say, “Francisco, I’ve just read a passage about [topic X].”

The words you put into those brackets are the main point of the passage.

See? The answer was in you all along! You’re just like the Karate Kid, but with less cultural appropriation.

Let’s do an example (using passage two from PrepTest 76, because that is where I opened my book while looking for an example to use).

[…reading…]

Feb 27 2017
0
Not a juror.

Not a juror.

Inference Questions are probably, as a class, my favorite type of Logical Reasoning questions. They're awesome. And if you want a strategy for dealing with Logical Reasoning questions on the LSAT, you could do a lot worse than starting with how Inference Questions work.

They underpin a lot of what we talk about when we talk about LSAT LR as a whole—the ideas of proof, and of Load-Bearing Language (a term I use to denote language that is big and aggressive enough to bear the burden of proof), and conditional reasoning, and language cues from answer choices. Inference Questions are the whole package, is what I’m saying (except for flaws. They don’t have flaws, usually, which is also in my estimation greatly to their credit).

Let’s pause there for a second; they don’t have flaws. This is because most Inference Questions are asked about passages that aren’t even arguments at all. They’re often just dumps of information.

Take question 17 from the second LR section in PrepTest 80—the December 2016 LSAT—for example.

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Feb 13 2017
0
This device is to be used only with tobacco products.

This device is to be used only with tobacco products.

So I was thinking about the problem of evil. And by this I do not mean the problematic fact that evil is sometimes done to people and/or animals and/or the only habitable planet in our solar system, nor am I referring to the problems caused to me personally by evil, such as being mugged, having my stereo stolen from my car, or having to wait in a very long line.

(And what's happening here is that I hope you come for the free LSAT prep and stay for the tangential meanderings, or vice versa. Either way, we're talking about getting ready for LSAT test day and we're talking about how LSAT flaws relate to you).

So, what I’m talking about here is the problem that the existence of evil poses to the theoretical underpinning for the existence of God; at least for the Western conception of him/her.

And I noticed a striking similarity between this problem of evil and the lack of any authoritative studies on the effects upon LSAT score of being, like, totally out of your mind on the "Cha Cha Salsa" (or the “diggity dank,” or the “Jamaican red hair,” or “the oregano,” if you will), while taking the test.

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Jan 30 2017
3
She is ready.

She is ready.

So, if you’ve been following this space, you have some idea of how to get ready for the LSAT. And if you’ve been savvy and good-looking enough to have enrolled in the Velocity LSAT course, then you are a world-beating monster when it comes to being ready for the LSAT.

But maybe you’re not quite, completely certain that you’re 100% ready for the day of the test, with all its stresses and joys.*

Well, my dahling, that’s why we’ve gathered here today.

Let’s do this:

There are 3 things you have to have in order to take the test 

(Take Test →Have These Things

Don’t Have These Things → Can’t Take Test)

Here’s what they are:

1. Your admission ticket. But only the first page! Do not play yourself by bringing pages 2-5 along with you. You’ll have only yourself to blame if you do. You will print up your admission ticket at LSAC.org, and you should NOT print it until the day before the exam—sometimes, they make last-minute changes, and you want to be certain you’re on top of those changes.